Marcel Duchamp With Bicycle Wheel – October 18, 1965

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYqDpNmnu8I

Marcel Duchamp spoke about his “Bicyle Wheel” on October 18, 1964

From Moma.org (Museum of Modern Art.) Although Duchamp had collected manufactured objects in his studio in Paris, it was not until he came to New York that he identified them as a category of art, giving the English name “Readymade” to any object purchased “as a sculpture already made.” When he modified these objects, for example by mounting a bicycle wheel on a kitchen stool, he called them “Assisted Readymades.” Duchamp later recalled that the original Bicycle Wheel was created as a “distraction”: “I enjoyed looking at it, just as I enjoy looking at the flames dancing in a fireplace.”

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Fishing Boats Bring Cuban Refugees to Miami – October 16, 1965

The Chicago Tribune wrote “Three dirty, little fishing boats, not one of them over 35 feet long, came chugging into port here early today loaded to the gunwales with sober but thankful Cuban refugees. Unbelievably, the three little boats carried 177 persons to Florida-54 in one, 39 in another, and 34 in the third. The men, with one exception, were gray. The women ranged from teenagers to grandmothers. At least a dozen were nursing babies, “But, my God, we are glad to be here,” they said in varying ways as they wearily climmbed across gangplanks.”

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Berkeley Anti War Rally – October 15, 1965

5,000-10,000 demonstrators (The accounts vary) gathered at a Berkeley anti war rally on Saturday, October 15, 1965. It marked the beginning of a week of protests across the country. The crowd attempted to march from Berkeley through Oakland to the Oakland army base, but they were turned back by 300 Oakland policemen.The rally was sponsored by the Vietnam Day Committee. Their stated goal was to tell the soldiers stationed at the base that they would be violating international law if they fought in Vietnam.

Governor Edmund Brown (Jerry Brown’s father) said of the protest “It gives aid and comfort to Hanoi.”

The following day saw more anti war rallies, mostly on college campuses. There was also march on Fifth Avenue in New York that drew 10,000 protesters as well as a large number of hecklers and counter protesters.

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1965 World Series – Dodgers Win – October 14, 1965

The Dodgers beat the Twins in the !965 World Series. The seventh and final game was played on October 14, 1965. Sandy Koufax pitched a three-hit, complete game shutout, and was named the series MVP. This was the second World Series MVP for Koufax. He won that honor for the first time in 1963, after the Dodgers swept the Yankees in four games. In the 1963 series Koufax won the first and last games, but his performance in 1963 pales in comparison to what he did two years later.

Now, what is most remembered about Koufax in the 1965 series, is not so much his almost other-worldly pitching performances in three games, instead, Koufax left his mark on the 1965 World Series in a game in which he did even not play. That would be the first game of the World Series, when Koufax, a not particularly religious man, chose to sit out, in observance of the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur.

Don Drysdale pitched the opener instead of Koufax. He got lit up and got lifted in the third inning, having given up seven runs. As he was handing the ball over to manager Walter Alston he allegedly said to him, “I bet right now you wish I was Jewish, too.”

Koufax did pitch game two and lost, even though he certainly pitched well enough to win; going six innings, striking out nine, and only giving up one earned run. Unfortunately for Koufax, the Twins’ Jim Kaat pitched even better and the Minnesota won 5-1.

In game three, the Dodgers’ Claude Osteen showed his teammates the correct way to muzzle an offense, as he shut out the Twins, allowing only five hits. Then, leading two games to one, the Twins had to face “the real Drysdale” in game four. LA won 7-2, and again Minnesota could only muster five hits. The Twins were even more helpless against Koufax in game five, losing 7-0. He struck out 10 and gave up four hits.

Minnesota made it interesting though, they won game six, 5-1, and the series was tied. But what they had actually won was the right to face Koufax a third time. And it was the same story. The Dodgers only managed to get two runs, but with Koufax on the mound, that was one more than they needed.

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Right to Work Repeal Effort Fails – October 13, 1965

Cartoon in favor of Right to Work Laws

Cartoon in favor of Right to Work Laws

The Johnson Administration gave up its effort to repeal section 14(B) of the Taft Hartley Act (Right to Work). (14B) guarantees the states the right to enact laws which prohibit compulsory union membership dues. Such laws have been described as “Right to Work” laws by their proponents. Organized labor opposed 14(B) when it was enacted in 1947, and has continued to oppose it to this day, arguing that it gives management an unfair advantag in Right to Work states.

Cartoon Opposing Right to Work Laws

Cartoon Opposing Right to Work Laws

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Beatles Norwegian Wood First Take – October 12, 1965

With the working title “This Bird has Flown,” the Beatles recorded the first take of their landmark hit, “Norwegian Wood.”

“Norwegian Wood” began to be written by John Lennon while on a skiing vacation in St. Moritz in the Swiss Alps with his wife Cynthia and producer George Martin and his wife between January 25th and February 7th, 1965. “It was during this time that John was writing songs for ‘Rubber Soul,’” George Martin recalls, “and one of the songs he composed in the hotel bedroom, while we were gathered round, nursing my broken foot, was a little ditty he would play to me on his acoustic guitar. He’d say, ‘What do you think of this one?’ It had a slightly sick lyric, which was very apt to me nursing my injured toe. The song was ‘Norwegian Wood.’” Read more, Beatlesbooks.com

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